Posted on

‘We’re back, baby’: New bill boosts US climate credibility

WASHINGTON — After a moment when hopes dimmed that the United States could become an international leader on climate change, legislation that Congress is poised to approve could rejuvenate the country’s reputation and bolster its efforts to push other nations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions more quickly. The head-snapping turn of events, which has generated a joyful case of whiplash among Democrats and environmentalists, is a reminder of how domestic politics is intertwined with worldwide diplomacy.

Posted on

Froma Harrop: Climate bill should please anyone who can be pleased

Froma Harrop
What? Good news in the fight to save the planet from rising temperatures?
Yes. It comes in the form of a bill than pleases both Sen. Joe Manchin and the Natural Resources Defense Council. It gives the senator from West Virginia some political chips — basically, money for West Virginians and a slightly looser leash on fossil fuels.
However, the emissions cuts envisioned in the bill could be 10 times bigger than the carbon released by helping said emitters, according to the NRDC, an environmental powerhouse.

Posted on

Who benefits from renewable energy subsidies? In Texas, it’s often fossil fuel companies that are fighting clean energy elsewhere

Texas is the No. 1 wind power producer in the U.S. Greg Smith/Corbis SABA via Getty Images

Nathan Jensen, The University of Texas at Austin College of Liberal Arts and Isabella Steinhauer, The University of Texas at Austin College of Liberal Arts

Texas is known for fiercely promoting its oil and gas industries, but it’s also the No. 2 renewable energy producer in the country after California. In fact, more than a quarter of all the wind power produced in the United States in 2021 was generated in Texas.

Posted on

Who benefits from renewable energy subsidies? In Texas, it’s often fossil fuel companies that are fighting clean energy elsewhere

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Nathan Jensen, The University of Texas at Austin College of Liberal Arts and Isabella Steinhauer, The University of Texas at Austin College of Liberal Arts (THE CONVERSATION) Texas is known for fiercely promoting its oil and gas industries, but it’s also the No. 2 renewable energy producer in the country after California. In fact, more than a quarter of all the wind power produced in the United States in 2021 was generated in Texas.

Posted on

Residential Solar Power Systems – Can They Help Reduce Emissions?

By Dan Lennon

The answer is yes, but only to a limited degree. Performance of these systems vary considerably and are

especially dependent on PSH (peak sunlight hours per day). Here is a list of U.S. states with their PSH scores.

For an area to be suitable for solar panel use, it must have a PSH of at least 4. (For reference, see https://www.solarreviews.com/blog/peak-sun-hours-explained) Ideal locations would have a PSH of 5 or more. Only seven states have a PSH greater than 5 – Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming.

Posted on

‘Big 3’ Power Providers Announce Price Hikes Amid Ongoing Energy Volatility

Households and businesses in Australia will pay more for electricity and gas in the coming months as energy providers work to deal with soaring wholesale costs.
The latest of the ‘Big Three’ energy providers, EnergyAustralia, announced its price hikes set to affect around two-thirds of its 2.4 million customers on Aug. 1. The other one-third of customers are currently on fixed-rate contracts and are shielded from price increases.
Average prices will increase 5.5 percent (or A$111 per year) for households in Victoria, 17.

Posted on

New York officials rule against bitcoin-mining power plant

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) State officials denied required air permit renewals Thursday to a bitcoin-mining power plant in the Finger Lakes that environmentalists called a threat to New York’s climate goals. In rejecting the renewals, the state Department of Environmental Conservation said Greenidge Generation’s ‘continued operations would be inconsistent with the statewide greenhouse gas emission limits” that New York is trying to meet under state law. The company said it would continue operating under its current permit while it challenged the decision.

Posted on

EPA’s Power To Regulate North Carolina’s Carbon Emissions Curbed

The Supreme Court on Thursday limited the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority to regulate North Carolina’s carbon emissions. (Shutterstock)NORTH CAROLINA — The Supreme Court on Thursday limited the Environmental Protection Agency’s authority to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants. This court ruling will limit federal officials’ efforts to fight climate change. The court ruled in favor of a few Republican-led states and coal companies. The court ruled that the EPA lacked the authority under the Clean Air Act to shift the nation’s energy production away from coal-powered plants to cleaner alternatives such as wind and solar power.

Posted on

Student activism leads Boston school to adopt solar

The Planet Protectors club at the Winsor School, an all-girls college prep day school, successfully launched a project that will cover one third of the school’s energy needs and is estimated to save the school over $1 million during the project’s life. April 25, 2022 Ryan KennedyStudents at the Winsor School in Boston, a daytime grades 5 to 12 all-girls college preparatory school, have taken matters of sustainability into their own hands, influencing the school to move ahead with a solar project that will cover 30% of the school’s energy needs and provide it with an estimated $28,000 in bill savings.

Posted on

Daily on Energy: California’s solar industry anxiously awaits next net metering steps

Subscribe today to the Washington Examiner magazine and get Washington Briefing: politics and policy stories that will keep you up to date with what’s going on in Washington. SUBSCRIBE NOW: Just $1.00 an issue! AWAITING THE FOLLOW-UP: California’s hardy solar industry is on ‘pins and needles’ in anticipation of action to reform the state’s net energy metering rules after a vote on the Public Utility Commission’s ‘NEM 3.0’ proposed decision was delayed indefinitely in February. NEM 3.0, first introduced in December, would update state regulations that provide for public utilities to purchase excess electricity generated by at-home solar panels, reducing the payoff for households.